Brazil | The Criterion Collection (#51) | Original Release

 Product Details

Product Type
DVD

Origin
America

UPC/EAN/Barcode
037429138526

Distributor
The Criterion Collection

Contents
» 3 Discs
» 3 Keepcases
» Plastic Slipcase Box
» Chapter Index
» 12-page Booklet

Out of Print
Yes

Still in Collection
Yes

Purchased At
www.cd-wow.com


 Disc 1

Contents
» Brazil (movie)
» - Director Cut (143 min 18 sec)
» Audio Commentary by Director Terry Gilliam
» Color Bars

Type
DVD, R0, NTSC

Picture
1.85:1 Non-Anamorphic

Audio
English DD 2.0 Surround

Subtitles
English HoH


 Disc 2

Contents
» Script Development
» - Script Development (text)
» - The Screenwriters (9 min 21 sec)
» Storyboards (Terry Gilliam's Original Dream Sequences)
» Production Design (text)
» Costume Design (5 min 13 sec)
» What Is Brazil? (29 min 5 sec)
» Special Effects (Text)
» The Score (9 min 38 sec)
» Theatrical Trailer (2 min 37 sec)
» Production and Publicity Stills
» The Battle Of Brazil: A Video History (55 min 6 sec)

Type
DVD, R0, NTSC


 Disc 3

Contents
» Brazil (movie)
» - Love Conquers All version (93 min 39 sec)
» Audio Commentary by Terry Gilliam Expert David Morgan
» Color Bars

Type
DVD, R0, NTSC

Picture
4:3 Non-Anamorphic

Audio
English DD 2.0 Surround

Subtitles
English HoH


 Movie Details

Original Title
Brazil

Year
1985

Director
Terry Gilliam

IMDb
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088846/


 Product Photos

 Discjunkie's Comments

Packaging / Design

In the early days, I'd probably rate this thing on the top of the scale all the way. But looking at in now the packaging isn't really really top notch. And here's why. This is in fact a nice looking set. We get 3 regular keepcases (clear plastic) with a nice looking "alternate" kind of artork. Inside we get a chapter index made to look like a document from the movie's Ministry Of Information (nice touch). All three cases then fit into a large plastic (that's right - plastic! not cardboard) slipcase.

And I guess that's where the dissapointment might come in. Because even if the slipcase looks very nice. It's a blue-shaded case with a Brazil logo on it and when you look at the front you can see through the slipcase and get a look at the first keepcase laying inside (wich also has a matching Brazil logo in the right place, which gives the whole thing a bit of a 3D-feel). The sad part about the outer case is that it feels very fragile. In fact, I ordered this twice because my first copy got trashed during transit. It's just one of those cases that pretty much brakes if you should ever (and I mean ever) drop it to the floor. But then again I've never actually tried dropping mine so I guess I could be wrong. Still, it just feels like it could've been done better.


Disc contents / Extras

Criterion have allways (almost) done movies right when it comes to extras and such. And Brazil is definetely a nice proof of that. First of (disc 1) is the 143 min (NTSC) director's cut of the film. This is the same version (or very close, it differs on a few seconds I'm told) as released on most other regions and the one to watch for all reasons.

On disc 2 we get a pretty wide range of extras featuring a number of stills as well as a bundle of text info about productions design and such. There are 3 small featurettes spanning over about 24 min in total, entitled The Screenwriters, Costume Design and The Score. After that we get to the What is Brazil? documentary wich features a number of older interviews with the cast and crew of the film. It's an interesting little thing but it could have been a bit longer I guess - Still, we get a lot of background as well as some funny interview takes with Michael Palin when he goes of pretending to be someone else (don't ask, just buy it!).

Finally (still on disc 2) we get a 55 min documentary entitled The Battle of Brazil - A Video History and THIS, ladies and gentlemen is what this set is all about. This is an extensive documentary featuring "Gilliam expert" David Morgan, and revolves around the movies troubled production.

For those of you who don't know the story; Terry Gilliam gave the studio a too long version to use in America and was asked to cut it down. Also, it was thaught by the studio that this film wouldn't sit right with the brauder Hollywood audience, and so, they wanted to make it a bit happier and give it a bit more of a "Hollywood ending". This started a big fight inbetween director Terry Gilliam and one of the studio executives.

This is a very well made documentary and it really changes the way you look at the film, knowing what could've been... so to speak. Anyway, getting to disc 3, there's an alternate version of the film labeled the "Love Conquers All" version. As I said before, the studio wanted to change the film and make it a bit "nicer" and not so bleak and disturbing. The version they made (completely without Gilliams liking) hasn't really been seen outside the US and doesn't appear on dvd anywhere else. I really enjoyd seeing this version of the film (just out of curiosity) and it's really chocking to see what "a few cuts" can do to a director's artistic vision.


Sidenotes

This release has been issued twice. The original release (shown here) has a Non-Anamorphic transfer. And is now out of print.

However, Criterion have re-issued this box set featuring an anamorphic transfer for the director's cut (they basically replaced the first disc with a brand new disc taken from their new single-disc release of the film).

Apart from this, the two versions of this box set are exactly the same.


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